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Dr Lily Chan

Experimental and Behavioural Economics

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Experimental and Behavioural Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof John Eu-Li Wong

Macroeconomics

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Macroeconomics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof Yong Kwet Yew

Applied Econometrics, Energy Economics

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Applied Econometrics, Energy Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Ms Aileen Tan

Health Economics

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Health Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Ms Jenny Lee

Health and Labour Economics

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Health and Labour Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof Andrew Wee

International Trade and Migration

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International Trade and Migration


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof Philip Li-Fan Liu

Health Economics

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Health Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof Bernard C Y Tan

Health and Labour Economics

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Health and Labour Economics


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.

Prof Phoon Kok Kwang

International Trade and Migration

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International Trade and Migration


Our group’s research consists of three parts; in vivo microcirculation, computational simulation, and in vitro microfluidics. We utilize an acute rodent model for microcirculation studies. In vivo microhemodynamic study provides us insightful information on how the abnormal alterations in blood property potentially impair microcirculatory functions. This study can be a part of the basic science leading to the future development of a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases.  We also develop computational models to study the cell dynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method. In this simulation study, we aim to examine the effects of cell aggregability and deformability on blood flow in microcirculation.  In order to study on physical or biochemical property changes in blood under pathological conditions, we develop a novel microfluidic device for quantification of the blood property at the single-cell level.